News

Death Becomes Natural

By Mike Webber - Published on Tuesday, 21 July 2009 12:36

As we get older, death can be a sensitive subject for us. The traditional process for dealing with the body of a recently deceased individual is something that is a large part of our culture. We generally have two images of what is done to our bodies when we die. The first one is the traditional burial. Embalming chemicals are placed in the body as a replacement for blood, the cadaver is dressed up and then placed into a coffin, usually made of metal or wood, and then buried six feet underground. Or, the process of cremation is used where the body is burned in an intense heat that leaves only bones, which are then smashed to dust resulting in the ashes that are usually put in an urn.

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Piecing Together the Alzheimer's Puzzle

By Kulbinder Saran Caldwell - Published on Tuesday, 21 July 2009 12:13

Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects 290,000 Canadians - which is one in 20 over the age of 65 with the numbers increasing to one in four for those over 85.  But those that are younger are also at risk.  Alzheimer Society of Canada (ASC) recently stated 71,000 Canadians under the age of 65 are living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia, of which approximately 70 percent or 50,000 are 59 or younger.  

Read more: Piecing Together the Alzheimer's Puzzle

New test accurately detects Alzheimer's in its earliest stages

By Marina Lowell - Published on Saturday, 04 July 2009 15:46

There is a new test that can detect Alzheimer's disease in its earliest stages. The test measures proteins in spinal fluid that can point to Alzheimer's. It is 87 percent accurate.

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Seniors mobility after hospitalization in question

By Kulbinder Saran Caldwell - Published on Saturday, 04 July 2009 14:35

Motivation and expectation are cited as positive influences to encourage older patients to regain their lost functional ability after hospitalization, says researchers with the Birmingham Veterans Administration Medical Center and UAB (University of Alabama at Birmingham).

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Addiction is a choice, not a disease

By Marina Lowell - Published on Saturday, 04 July 2009 12:58

Since the 1900s, much of the treatment and public policy for addiction has been based on the idea that addiction is a disease. Psychologist Gene Heyman has done research on choice, cognition and drug use. He found that addiction is a matter of choice, therefore it doesn't fit the clinical definition of behavioural illness. By definition, a behavioural disease is compulsive; it’s beyond the influence of reward, punishment, expectations, cultural values, personal values. It was thought that drug use starts as voluntary, and then becomes involuntary.

Read more: Addiction is a choice, not a disease

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